How to Search this Blog?

Use the search button on the right side to look for someone’s name among more than 790 posts I wrote about this RCAF squadron. 

 

After you can use the comment section or the contact form below to share stories and photos.

 

Notes on Kenneth Windsor

Updated 22 July 2021

Links to posts about Kenneth Windsor

About another unsung hero

Kenneth Windsor’s Evasion Report

How to Search this Blog?


Updated 21 July 2021

I had to update this post which was in the draft section. They were notes I had about Kenneth Windsor.

This is what triggered it.

I cannot thank you enough Pierre on your article for me on Kenneth Windsor from 2018.

I never anticipated such a detailed account of his exploits during the war.I had and have a deep respect for him and all who served in the conflict.

Sorry it took so long to get back to you but life sometimes gets in the way.Your work is so greatly appreciated by myself and all who read.

Again thank you for a great read on a remarkably modest man.

Barry Nash


Thursday, 15 April, 1943

The weather was clear and bright.

Rodeo 204:

W/C Johnson led the Squadron which, with 416, acted as 4th Fighter Echelon, crossing into France at Bercks Mer at 25,000 feet. The Wing swept to port, being vectored by Special Control to the St. Omer area where it maneuvered to contact enemy aircraft, which were not sighted. There was neither flak nor enemy shipping sighted. The Wing came out West of Calais at 25,000 feet and in about Dover. Up at 1730 and down at 1850 hours. Sections:

Blue Section Red Section Yellow Section
F/L Magwood W/C Johnson F/L Godefroy
F/O MacKay P/O Dowding Sgt McGarrigle
F/O Fowlow F/O Cameron F/O Aitken
Sgt Brown F/O Wozniak

Thirteen sorties of local flying were made and two sorties went on patrol at Beachy Head.

P/O P.K. Gray, W/O J.A. Wilson, F/S G.M. Shouldice and Sgt K.D. Windsor were all posted in for flying duties from 401 Squadron.

F/L R.W. McNair, DFC, was posted supernumerary from 412 Squadron. He has a record of eight destroyed, five probable, eight damaged – mostly gained in the Middle East.

Cpl S.W. Calvert, Armourer, was posted to the Squadron from 3 PRC Bournemouth.

Sunday, 20 June, 1943

It was sunny and bright today with approximately 3/10ths cloud.

Circus 313:

S/L Godefroy led the wing whose role was that of forward target support in the Abbeville – Amiens – Poix area while 12 Bostons were bombing the Poix aerodrome.

The Wing crossed out at Rye and joined up with the Hornchurch Wing. They began climbing and crossed into France at Quand Plage at 12,000 feet, then flew to Abbeville and Amiens at 22,000 feet and Poix at 23,000 feet. Appledore Control then gave a vector of 010? and the Wing reached Aux-le-Chateaux at 24,000 feet.

Yellow Section of 403 Squadron went down on three FW 190s that were 1,000 feet below and going in the opposite direction but were unable to engage them.

Sox FWs were seen by the Squadron and a further 12 were reported coming in behind the Wing at 24,000 feet.

They were first reported as friendly but later were found to be FW 190s and the Wing turned to face them. 421 Squadron were engaged, and their CO, S/L R.W. McNair, DFC, fired at three e/as, two with no results and the other was shot down and destroyed.

The Wing was now approaching Abbeville and was somewhat broken up. As the Wing Leader tried to reform the Wing, a further 50 FW 190s were seen coming towards Abbeville at 27,000 feet and this prevented the Wing from reforming.

403 was ordered to dive towards the Somme Estuary which they did but Blue Section had become separated. Near Aux-Le-Chateaux, Blue 1 had spotted a FW 190 making for Blue 4, Sgt Windsor, and ordered Blue Section to crank but Blue 4, Sgt Windsor, did not respond and was next seen with black smoke pouring from his aircraft as he had been hit.

Later, while Blue Section was trying to reform, Blue 2, P/O Elliot, lost height on account of oxygen trouble and Blue 1 and 3 followed him as he dove. They lost sight of him in thin cloud and he wasn’t seen again and is posted as missing.

By this time, Blue 1 and 3 had lost the Squadron and so made for the coast. A gaggle of about 20 FWs were encountered and, after 1 FW was reported as being right beside them, Blue 1 ordered Blue 3 to break. Blue 3 merely did a gentle turn and was hit by the FW 190. He was later seen by Blue 1 to be in a spin with about eight FWs on his tail. This was the last seen of Blue 3 (P/O F.C. McWilliams) and he is reported as missing. South of Le Touquet Blue 1 out-turned the other FW 190s and crossed out at Hardelot.

421 Squadron did not formate on 403 Squadron but climbed up to 32,000 feet and crossed out at Cap Gris Nez and in at Dungeness at 5,000 feet. There was no flak reported and no shipping seen. The Sections were as follows:

Blue Section Red Section Yellow Section
F/L MacDonald S/L Godefroy F/O Marshall
P/O J.C. Elliot P/O Abbotts P/O Dowding P/O F.C. McWilliams F/O Fowlow P/O Ogilvie
Sgt K.D. Windsor WO Wilson Sgt Small


KENNETH DIGORY WINDSOR

Kenneth, widow of Della, passed away peacefully, with his family by his side, at Grace General Hospital on Friday, February 1, 2008, at the age of 88 years.

Kenneth was born on January, 3 1920, the son of Digory and Dorcas (Lovell) Windsor. Ken was eldest son of a large family, born in the rural town of La Riviere, Manitoba.

As a young man he served as a Spitfire pilot of the Royal Canadian Air Force, Squadron 403, in England during the Second World War. While overseas, he met, and married, Della on December 3, 1942.

On his return home after the war, he took up the position of salesman with Canada Packers Ltd., where he worked faithfully for nearly 40 years, until his retirement.

As well, Ken was actively involved as a Chief Instructor with the Canadian Air Force cadets, #191 Squadron, in particular, as range officer, winning numerous awards.

After retiring, Ken and his wife enjoyed many hours outside, spending the summers planting flowers, and reading in their gazebo.

His numerous friends, and relatives will remember Ken, as a fair and compassionate man who had a genuine caring for the plight of others. Ken loved to interact with people and would easily converse with anyone who crossed his path. He also cherished his time spent hunting, fishing, and golfing with friends and family and had a real love and respect for nature.

Ken will be sorely missed by his brothers, Mike (Crystal City) and Ivan (Winnipeg), as well as his children, David, Kenneth, Craig, Dale, and Kimberly, as well as cherished grandchildren, and great-grandchildren throughout Western Canada.

Ken was predeceased by his loving wife Della, three brothers, (Clem, William, Jack), and three sisters (Mildred, Velma, Edna).

Thank you to the staff of Grace General Hospital for all your care and compassion during Ken’s latter stage of life. Our heartfelt thanks are extended to the staff at Calvary Place Personal Care Home of Winnipeg, who went above and beyond the call of duty so often to ensure his comfort and care, especially Helmut, Kevin, JoAnne, Christine, Rodger, Thelma, Carol, Pompei, Bonita, Jeremy, and Rodney.

A celebration of Ken’s life will be held at 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 6 at Chapel Lawn Funeral Home at 4000 Portage Avenue. Reception will immediately follow the service. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Ken’s memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Manitoba, 6 Donald St., Winnipeg, MB R3L 0K6, or The Kidney Foundation of Canada, Manitoba Branch, 730 Taylor Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 2K8. Arrangements entrusted to: Chapel Lawn Funeral Home 885-9715

As published in the Winnipeg Free Press on Feb 04, 2008


PERSONNE PASSÉE PAR COMÈTE VIA LES PYRÉNÉES

Dernière mise à jour le 3 avril 2018.

Kenneth Digory WINDSOR / R106450
La Riviere, Manitoba, Canada
Né le 3 janvier 1920 à La Riviere, Manitoba, Canada / † le 1er février 2008 à Winnipeg, Canada.
Sgt RCAF, RAF Fighter Command 403 Squadron, pilote.
Lieu d’atterrissage : à environ 2 km de Nielles-lès-Bléquin, à 8 km au sud-ouest de Lumbres, Pas-de-Calais (Nord), France.
Spitfire Supermarine Mk IX, BS383, abattu par un chasseur Fw190 au nord de Hesdin, le 20 juin 1943 en escorte de la mission Circus 313 sur l’aérodrome de Poix-du-Nord, à l’Est de Cambrai, France.
Ecrasé à Nielles-lès-Bléquin, au sud-ouest de Saint-Omer, Pas-de-Calais, France.
Durée : 7 semaines
Passage des Pyrénées : le 11 août 1943

Informations complémentaires :

Rapport d’évasion SPG 3314/1367 (complet).

Le Spitfire décolle de Kenley vers 12h27. Près d’une demi-heure plus tard, alors qu’il vole à 8000m, il est attaqué au-dessus de la cible par un chasseur Fw190, qui le poursuit vers le Nord. Il semble qu’il ait été abattu au Nord de Hesdin par l’Hptm. Wilhem-F. Galland du Stab II./JG 26. Le Spitfire est touché et Windsor est atteint par un de ses débris, perd momentanément connaissance et reprend ses esprits alors qu’il se trouve à une altitude d’environ 4600 m. L’alimentation en carburant est coupée et un début d’incendie se déclare. Il décide de mettre cap au Nord en vue de retourner à sa base. 10 minutes plus tard, son moteur se coupe net et il abandonne son avion à environ 4600 m. Au cours de sa descente en parachute, il aperçoit son Spitfire qui s’écrase et explose.

Windsor se tord la cheville droite en atterrissant. Il enterre son parachute et sa Mae West et rampe vers le sud sur près de 2 km. Près d’un bois, il entend des voix parlant anglais et semblant être à sa recherche. Il décide de jouer la prudence et ne les contacte pas. Il va se reposer dans un autre bois et enlève les badges de son uniforme, les conservant dans une poche. Chaussé de souliers ordinaires, il marche jusqu’à environ 23 heures et atteint le village de Ledinghem où il rampe dans l’étable d’une ferme où il s’endort.

Au matin du 21 juin, Windsor, qui ne parle pas le français, approche un fermier et lui montre ses ailes de la RAF. L’homme lui serre les mains, lui donne de quoi se nourrir ainsi que quelques vêtements civils. Vers 10 heures du matin, il se remet en route en direction du sud. Il marche toute la journée et arrive vers 21h00 au village de Bourthes où il passe la nuit à nouveau dans une étable.

Le lendemain matin, 22 juin, il s’arrête à une ferme pour y demander à boire. On lui donne de quoi se désaltérer, mais les gens lui paraissant peu amicaux et il poursuit son chemin. Il arrive dans la soirée à Bimont où il montre ses ailes RAF à un fermier, HAJARDEZ, environ 45 ans, qui lui donne à manger et chez qui il passe la nuit. Le lendemain, 23 juin, HAJARDEZ le mène à la maison du maire de Wicquinghem, le cultivateur Gaston PÉROY, environ 50 ans, qui lui donne à manger ainsi que d’autres vêtements civils. Durant son séjour chez PÉROY, Windsor y voit Robert Barckley.

Windsor et Barckley restent loger chez PÉROY jusqu’au 27 juin, jour où Lucien PÉROY, le fils du maire, environ 20 ans, et frère de Michel PÉROY, le guide jusqu’à la maison de Norbert et Marguerite FILLERIN à Renty, où il retrouve Barckley. Pendant son séjour chez FILLERIN, Windsor est pris en photo puis reçoit de nouveaux faux documents d’identité. Son évasion est dès lors organisée, de même que celle de Barckley avec lequel il reste jusqu’au 21 juillet.

Kenneth Windsor (à gauche) et Robert Barckley en juin 1943 chez les FILLERIN

wp-1626943875338.png

source photographique : http://www.fondationresistance.org/documents/cnrd/Doc00423.pdf

Barckley et Windsor avaient été pris en charge par Eugène D’HALLENDRE de La Madeleine (Lille) et ils arrivent tous deux en train à Paris le 21 juillet où ils sont alors séparés. [Eugène D’HALLENDRE, né en 1898, cheminot à la SNCF, venait d’être arrêté, le 20 juillet 1943, sur dénonciation, en même temps que son épouse Lucienne, leur fils Edgar l’étant un peu plus tard. Eugène D’HALLENDRE a été fusillé par les Allemands à Bondues le 27 décembre 1943. Edgar D’HALLENDRE, né en 1922, figure comme sa mère Lucienne, née BUYSSE en 1899, à la liste des Déportés français et ont survécu au conflit.]

Rosine THERIER, épouse du londonien Sydney Witton en captivité, confirme avoir convoyé Windsor et Barckley de chez M. DIDIER à Arras jusque Paris et les y avoir remis à Jacques Le GRELLE. Émile DIDIER et son épouse Madeleine CARON habitaient au 22 Rue de Bapaume à Arras. Arrêtés par la suite, le 24 juillet 1943, ils seront tous deux dans le convoi des “Nacht und Nebel” du 4 mai 1944 à destination de la Prison de Saint-Gilles à Bruxelles. Déportés en Allemagne, Émile DIDIER, né en 1889 mourra au camp de Gross-Rosen le 15 janvier 1945 et son épouse Madeleine, née en 1892, disparaîtra au camp de Ravensbrück en février 1945.

A la page 14 de son rapport E&E 63, Bernard Kœnig précise qu’il quitte Paris en train le 22 juillet depuis la gare Montparnasse à destination de Bordeaux avec “Alexandre” (un autre pseudo de Jean-François NOTHOMB) et William Murphy. Koenig ajoute, sans la nommer, qu’une autre dame (Rosine WITTON-THERIER) se trouve dans le même train, guidant, elle, un pilote de Typhoon, qui est Bob Barckley.

Windsor reste jusqu’au 1er août au 16 Rue Royer-Collard, Paris VIe chez un ex-pilote de 55 ans, M. Paul ROUTY et sa nièce Jeanne, 30 ans, qui, elle, parle parfaitement l’anglais. [Paul Louis Camille ROUTY, né en 1883, avait terminé son service en 1914-1918 comme capitaine, Commandant de l’Escadrille MF 1 du 2ème Groupe d’Aviation. Il est décédé à Saint-Briac-sur-Mer, le 30 septembre 1960.] Windsor est hébergé chez les ROUTY jusqu’au 1er août et loge ensuite chez un médecin, le Dr Pierre HABREKORN au 6 Avenue du Parc à Vanves.

Le dimanche 8 août, Windsor est amené dans une station de métro par Jean-François NOTHOMB (“Franco”) et y rencontre Thomas Slack. Ils y attendent impatiemment le retour de Franco et finissent par attirer l’attention des usagers.

NOTHOMB les rejoint finalement et guide Slack et Windsor vers une gare de chemin de fer où ils prennent le train de 22 heures pour Bordeaux. Dans le train, les deux aviateurs reçoivent une nouvelle carte d’identité. A Bordeaux, ils prennent le train pour Dax. Ils y rencontrent Thomas Hunt et William Aguiar, deux américains qui ont voyagé en même temps sans que NOTHOMB ne mette les uns et les autres au courant. Ils louent des bicyclettes à Dax et atteignent vers 18 heures la sortie de Bayonne, où ils se rendent dans un café où ils passent la nuit. C’est chez Pierre ARRIEUMERLOU au 12 Quai Augustin Chaho, le long de la Nive.

Le 10, ils roulent jusque Saint-Jean-de-Luz où ils arrivent vers 19 heures et laissent les vélos à la gare. Un guide les conduit à pied de Saint-Jean-de-Luz à Ciboure, où le pont sur la Nivelle est gardé par une sentinelle allemande. Ils passent sans encombre de l’autre côté et mangent dans des fourrés hors de Ciboure où ils rencontrent deux autres guides basques (dont Florentino GOÏKOETCHEA) et un Français. Le premier guide (NOTHOMB) les quitte là.

Il s’agit du 50e passage de Comète. Ils traversent les Pyrénées entre Biriatou et Irun vers 03 heures du matin le 11, seuls avec les guides basques. Ils vont à une ferme et y mangent. Ils prennent ensuite le tram pour San Sebastian et logent trois nuits dans un garage, chez Bernardo ARACAMA au n°7, 5e étage à gauche, Calle Aguirre, quartier de Miramon à San Sebastian.

Le 14, une voiture consulaire prend Windsor, Aguiar, Hunt et Slack à Madrid. Ils y restent jusqu’au 18. Le vice-consul de Séville vient alors les prendre en voiture pour les conduire sur la côte Atlantique, qu’ils atteignent le 19 août en milieu de matinée. Les quatre évadés y embarquent le 20 sur le “Borgholm”, un navire marchand norvégien, et y sont cachés sous l’arbre de l’hélice. Le 20, le bateau part pour Gibraltar, qu’il atteint le 21.

Kenneth Windsor quitte Gibraltar en avion le 23 août (vraisemblablement avec Slack, Hunt et Aguiar) et arrive à Whitchurch en Angleterre le lendemain. Il est interrogé par le MI9 ce même 24 août 1943 à Londres.

Mot de remerciement laissé dans le carnet de Jeanine DE GREEF (à Anglet) le mardi 10 août 1943.

Après son retour au Canada la guerre finie, Kenneth Windsor servit encore quelques années comme Instructeur-en-chef pour les cadets de la Royal Canadian Air Force du No. 191 Squadron.

(c) Philippe Connart, Michel Dricot, Edouard Renière, Victor Schutters

PERSONNE PASSÉE PAR COMÈTE VIA LES PYRÉNÉES

Dernière mise à jour le 3 avril 2018.

Robert Edward BARCKLEY / 138650
151 Studland Road, Hanwell, Middlesex, UK.
Né le 18 novembre 1920 près de Londres / en vie en 2016
Fl/Off, RAF Fighter Command 3 Squadron, Pilote.
Lieu d’atterrissage “2 miles SW of Bergues”, donc aux environs de Crochte (Nord), France.
Hawker Typhoon IB, EK227, QO-D, abattu le 2 juin 1943 par la Flak en attaquant un train au Nord de Menin (mission “Rhubarb” sur la Belgique).
Posé sur le ventre.
Durée : 8 semaines.
Passage des Pyrénées : le 25 juillet 1943.

Informations complémentaires :

Rapport d’évasion SPG 3314/1361.

Robert Barckley et un autre pilote, Richard Purdon, décollent de West Malling. Arrivés au-dessus des côtes de France, ils obliquent vers la Belgique et aperçoivent un train assurant la liaison entre Poperinge et Ieper (Ypres). Barckley descend très bas et survole la locomotive pour prévenir son conducteur. Ce dernier stoppe son train et s’échappe dans la campagne. Barckley mitraille alors la locomotive qui est détruite. Les deux pilotes s’attaquent ensuite à des bateaux amarrés le long de l’Escaut (de Schelde) puis reprennent la direction de la France. Barckley a l’intention de larguer ses bombes sur le terrain d’aviation de Dunkerque.

Au-dessus de la frontière belge, au sud de Dunkerque, des tirs de la Flak légère le visent, mais son appareil ne lui semble pas avoir été touché, bien que sa radio soit hors d’usage. Les deux pilotes se dirigent toujours vers Dunkerque et, à l’approche de Bergues, Barckley mitraille un train de marchandises, que Purdon voit exploser à distance. Purdon survole le train, mais ne voit plus le Typhoon de son camarade. Ne pouvant l’atteindre par radio, il le cherche, survole la zone du train qu’avait détruit Barckley, mais n’en trouvant aucune trace, il rentre en Angleterre et fait son rapport, pensant que d’une façon ou d’une autre, Barckley n’a pas pu s’en sortir. (Richard Michael Hastings Purdon, canadien, trouvera la mort le 30 juin 1943 lors d’une autre mission “Rhubarb” sur Dunkerque. Il repose au cimetière municipal de la localité).

En fait, Robert Barckley rapporte dans son rapport SPG que lors de l’attaque du train, son appareil a été touché par un obus de la Flak légère. Ses commandes sont hors d’usage, le bout de l’une de ses ailes est détruit et de la fumée emplit son cockpit. Le Typhoon heurte quelques arbres alors qu’il vole encore à grande vitesse, s’écrase et rebondit au-dessus de quelques maisons, arrêtant sa course sur le ventre près d’un poste de la Flak allemande. Il en sort vivant mais sérieusement blessé au visage. Il se débarrasse rapidement de sa Mae West, rassemble ses documents et cartes de vol et se dirige plein Sud. Il rentre dans un café et s’adresse en français aux clients… qui ne parlent que le flamand. On parvient à lui indiquer où se trouvent les postes allemands, qu’il parvient donc à éviter. Après une marche d’environ 3 km, il enterre sa carte géographique de l’Angleterre et ses cartes de codes avant de reprendre sa route et s’arrêter à une ferme à environ 8 km plus loin. Il montre ses plaques d’identité aux fermiers, qui lui donnent à manger, lui remettent une chemise sans col et une casquette et lui indiquent le chemin vers “Beelezeele, 10 miles SW of Bergues” (qui doit donc être Bollezeele). Arrivé dans ce village dans l’après-midi du 2 juin, Barckley va se réfugier dans une église (l’Eglise Saint Wandrille) où la servante du curé absent lui dit de revenir le soir vers 19h30. Il va se cacher dans un champ de maïs et retourne au presbytère dès qu’il entend sonner les cloches du soir. Le curé n’était toujours pas revenu, mais il y trouve une dame à laquelle il décline son identité. La dame fait venir sa nièce de 10 ans, qui mène l’aviateur chez le médecin du village, absent lorsqu’ils arrivent chez lui. Deux peintres en bâtiment se trouvent là et l’un d’eux va chercher l’épouse du médecin, à laquelle il montre ses plaquettes d’identité. La femme le cache dans son jardin et elle lui apprend que son mari avait aidé auparavant un aviateur blessé. Barckley indique dans l’Appendix C de son rapport qu’il pense que le médecin avait entretemps accompagné l’un des peintres à Lederzeele pour prendre contact avec un Helper.

Au crépuscule, toujours le 2 juin, un peintre guide Barckley vers Lederzeele et le mène chez Émile DEGRAVE, qui le loge jusqu’au 17 juin. DEGRAVE lui apprend qu’il n’est membre d’aucune organisation, ajoutant seulement qu’il avait aidé en 1941 un aviateur tchèque blessé pour le conduire à Lille. Le 3 juin, DEGRAVE se rend à Saint-Omer pour rencontrer “The Little Sisters” (sic SPG) dans un couvent. Les sœurs lui donnent des vêtements civils que DEGRAVE remet à Barckley et conduit ce dernier à Saint-Omer le 4 juin pour le faire prendre en photo. DEGRAVE lui dit qu’une dame de Saint-Omer avait fait partie d’une organisation. Barckley ignore le nom de cette dame mais donne celui de sa soeur en Angleterre (“Mrs. Christie, 28 Royal Crescent, Holland Park, W.11”)

Toujours le 4 juin, un homme passe le voir chez DEGRAVE et lui apprend que son Typhoon se trouve toujours à l’endroit où il s’est posé. Barckley suggère alors à DEGRAVE de tenter d’y mettre le feu. Munis de produits inflammables, Barckley et DEGRAVE accompagnent l’homme sur place le même jour. Le plan échoue, car un soldat allemand était assis dans le cockpit, un autre se tenait sur une aile et un engin de levage se trouvait à proximité. La dame de Saint-Omer vient ensuite lui remettre une (fausse) carte d’identité, lui apprenant que son organisation avait été démantelée. Dans son rapport, Barckley indique que le “17” juin, un Mr “ABBÉ” de Lumbres l’a conduit vers la maison de Marguerite FILLERIN (née CADET) à Renty. Il apparaît que Barckley a été hébergé par Albert BECQUET, Route de Saint-Omer à Lederzeele avant d’arriver à Renty. Gaston PEROY, environ 50 ans, cultivateur et maire de Wicquinghem (Pas-de-Calais), l’héberge jusqu’au 27 juin.

Barckley rencontre là Kenneth D. Windsor. Les deux hommes sont ensuite conduits le 27 juin, dans la maison de Marguerite FILLERIN à Renty par Lucien PÉROY, le fils du maire, environ 20 ans, et frère de Michel PÉROY. Ils sont hébergés jusqu’au 21 juillet par Marguerite (dont le mari, Norbert FILLERIN avait été arrêté en mars 1943).

Kenneth Windsor (à gauche) et Robert Barckley en juin 1943 chez les FILLERIN

source photographique : http://www.fondationresistance.org/documents/cnrd/Doc00423.pdf

Barckley et Windsor avaient été pris en charge par Eugène D’HALLENDRE de La Madeleine (Lille) et ils arrivent tous deux en train à Paris le 21 juillet où ils sont ensuite séparés. [Eugène D’HALLENDRE, né en 1898, cheminot à la SNCF, venait d’être arrêté, le 20 juillet 1943, sur dénonciation, en même temps que son épouse Lucienne, leur fils Edgar l’étant un peu plus tard. Eugène D’HALLENDRE a été fusillé par les Allemands à Bondues le 27 décembre 1943. Edgar D’HALLENDRE, né en 1922, figure comme sa mère Lucienne, née BUYSSE en 1899, à la liste des Déportés français et ont survécu au conflit.]

Prise par Eugène D’HALLENDRE, elle figure dans les collections du Musée de la Résistance à Bondues.

Bob Barckley est remis à Maurice GRAPIN par Jacques LE GRELLE et va loger chez les beaux-parents de GRAPIN à Vanves, où il rencontre William Murphy qui y est déjà. GRAPIN les remet à Jacques LE GRELLE à la station de métro Duroc en cette fin du mois de juillet.

Rosine THERIER, épouse du londonien Sydney Witton en captivité, confirme avoir convoyé Windsor et Barckley de chez M. DIDIER à Arras jusque Paris et les y avoir remis à Jacques le GRELLE. Émile DIDIER et son épouse Madeleine CARON habitent au 22 Rue de Bapaume à Arras. Arrêtés par la suite, le 24 juillet 1943, ils seront tous deux dans le convoi des “Nacht und Nebel” du 4 mai 1944 à destination de la Prison de Saint-Gilles à Bruxelles. Déportés en Allemagne, Émile DIDIER, né en 1889 mourra au camp de Groß-Rosen le 15 janvier 1945 et son épouse Madeleine, née en 1892, disparaîtra au camp de Ravensbrück en février 1945.

A la page 14 de son rapport E&E 63, Bernard Kœnig précise qu’il quitte Paris en train le 22 juillet depuis la gare Montparnasse à destination de Bordeaux avec “Alexandre” (un autre pseudo de Jean-François NOTHOMB) et William Murphy. Koenig ajoute, sans la nommer, qu’une autre dame (Rosine WITTON-THERIER) se trouve dans le même train, guidant, elle, un pilote de Typhoon, qui est Bob Barckley.

Le 23 juillet à midi, Barckley, Koenig et Murphy arrivent à Bordeaux, guidés par Mme WITTON qui, ayant appris qu’elle était brûlée dans le Nord, rentre ensuite à Paris. Ils prennent le train pour Dax avec Jean-François NOTHOMB (“Franco”) d’où ils se rendent à Bayonne en vélos de location. Koenig précise qu’ils roulent pendant 5 heures et 55 km jusqu’à un endroit à 25 km de Bayonne où ils se reposent un peu dans une auberge. Ils sont rejoints là vers 21 heures, par Robert Conroy et un civil belge, Ronald “Ronnie” Watteeuw. Le groupe loge alors à l’auberge en question, celle de Larre à Sutar, gérée par Jeanne Marthe MENDIARA.

Barckley, Murphy, Koenig, Conroy et Watteeuw, de même que Leslie de Biziens et Henriette Benech, accompagnés d’un guide basque et de Jean-François NOTHOMB, passent la frontière dans la nuit du 24 au 25 juillet dans ce 49ème passage de Comète par Saint-Jean-de-Luz et la Bidassoa. A une quinzaine de kilomètres de la frontière, ils s’arrêtent à une ferme espagnole où ils se reposent. Les femmes (les 2 évadées) les quittent tandis que le reste du groupe descend vers un village (que Conroy ne nomme pas, mais qui est Renteria). De Renteria, toujours le 25 juillet 1943, ils prennent un tram jusque San Sebastian. NOTHOMB retourne en France et Ronnie WATTEEUW est séparé du groupe qui est conduit à Madrid. (Selon un rapport de WATTEEUW – voir sa page – les quatre aviateurs dont Conroy ont fait le voyage avec lui depuis Dax jusqu’à Gibraltar…indiquant que le voyage vers San Sebastian s’est fait en auto, que de là ils ont été ensemble également en auto jusqu’à Madrid, puis à Malaga, d’où ils sont passés “en barque” jusque Gibraltar où ils arrivent le 5 août…)

Dans son propre rapport, Bob Barckley indique qu’après être passé par Renteria, San Sebastian et Madrid, il se retrouve à Séville. Là, il monte à bord du navire “Esneh” qui quitte Seville le 11 août et arrive à Gilbraltar le 13. Les sergents J.R. Milne (Wellington BK162 – SPG 3314/1360) et H. Riley (Halifax DT670 – SPG 3314/1359), évacués par la ligne Oaktree/Burgundy, font le voyage avec lui. Barckley quitte Gibraltar par avion le 16, arrive à Hendon le 17 août 1943 et est interrogé à Londres le même jour pour l’établissement de son rapport.

Barckley est de retour au 3 Squadron le 25 août 1943 et continue à voler sur Typhoons, et plus tard Tempests jusqu’en fin novembre 1944, mais uniquement au-dessus de l’Angleterre ou de la Manche. Bob Barckley abat une douzaine de V-1 en 1944, dont la toute première bombe volante. Il ne retournera en mission au-dessus de l’Allemagne qu’après la libération de la Belgique. Voir le livre de Brian Cull “Diver! Diver! Diver! RAF and American Fighter Pilots Battle the V-1 Assault over South-East England, 1944-45”. Editeur : Grub Street (31 juillet 2008).

Extrait de la “London Gazette” du 3 novembre 1944 : Flying Officer Robert Edward BARCKLEY (138650), R.A.F.V.R., 3 Sqn. Flying Officer Barckley has completed very many sorties including successful attacks on enemy shipping and rail and road communications. In other sorties he has destroyed 12 flying bombs. He has invariably displayed a high degree of courage and his devotion to duty has been unfailing.

Merci à Diana Morgan pour la photo de Bob Barckley en uniforme.

Robert Barckley (au centre de l’image) et d’autres pilotes étudiant les propriétés des Fusées V-1 allemandes (photo de 1944 – IWM CH1348)

En octobre 2008, Edouard Renière a eu le plaisir de conduire Robert Barckley, à sa demande, près du monument à la mémoire de son ami, le pilote belge de la RAF Jean de Selys Longchamps, qui avait mitraillé les bureaux de la Gestapo à l’Avenue Louise le 20 janvier 1943 aux commandes de son Hawker Typhoon. Accompagnaient Robert Barckley, très ému, ce jour-là, Mme Sybille de Selys Longchamp, nièce de Jean ainsi que notre ami John Clinch. Jean de Selys Longchamps a perdu la vie au retour d’une mission le 16 août 1943 et repose au Minster (Thanet) Cemetery, près de Manston au Royaume-Uni.

Mot de remerciement de Robert Barckley dans le carnet de Jeanine De Greef.

Photos de Edouard Renière.

(c) Philippe Connart, Michel Dricot, Edouard Renière, Victor Schutters

https://www.evasioncomete.be/fwindsokd.html

Request – Missing names – Part Three

Post 800

I have come a long way since I started writing about 403 Squadron. What I wrote came mainly from comments like this one from Stephen Nickerson…

Hello Pierre;
I believe the pilot furthest to the right seating is Charles Magwood and not the pilot right of padre Carlson.

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002)~19.jpeg

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002).jpeg

As an amateur historian I am always amazed by some of my readers’ knowledge or expertise. Last year Stephen Nickerson jump started a research about Flight Lieutenant Frank Sorensen.

 

The story is here…

Getting back to Dean Black’s request…

Hello Pierre, I have discovered a new photo – one many of us have not seen before. We need help with the names. Would you be interested?

Dean Black

Dean had written back…

Here is a photo that we don’t think many people have yet seen. We don’t know all the names. Here is what we do know:

The photo appears to have been taken in Kenley, Surrey in May 1943, and the names Magwood and J.E. Johnson are found in the filename.

I have identified the following:

(Back Row standing, left to right): F/O Johnson; unknown; Walter “Wally” Conrad; Norm Fowlow; Padré Don Carlson; Squadron Leader Charlie Magwood; unknown; unknown possibly Roy Wozniak; unknown; and, P/O Monty Berger (Int Offr).

(Front Row seated, left to right): unknown; unknown; unknown; Brannigan; Middlemiss; McWilliams; Dowding; and, unknown.

I hope some of your knowledgeable readers might be able to fill in the blanks.

Sincerely,

Dean

Dean C. Black, CD, CAE, SMP, B.Sc, MA, rmc, MALIC (York St John)

Lieutenant-Colonel (Ret)

Executive Director | RCAF Association

Editor-Publisher | Revue Airforce Magazine

Secretary | RCAF Association Trust Fund

Now will the right Charles Maywood please rise up…

But I am not the only one who likes to compare who’s who on group photos…

Joe is trying hard.

Untitled-2.jpgUntitled-1.jpg

But Stephen Nickerson wrote a comment and he thinks he finally has the answer…

Hi Pierre;

Looked at some more at these photos. The first one I believe are Padre Don Carlson and Hugh Godefroy. Third person seating (12th enlarged photo) from the left is A/M Trafford Leigh-Mallory. Fifth person standing (5th enlarged photo) from the left is Padre Carlson. First person standing left (first enlarged photo) could be S/L Milwood (Controller at Kenley 1943). And as I said earlier, I believe the person seating first right (17th enlarged photo) is Charles Magwood. I’m guessing this photo was taken some time in May or June after Magwood had resumed command of the 403 after Sid Ford became Wing Commander of Digby Wing. 

 

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002).jpeg
 

A/M Trafford Leigh-Mallory

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002)~6.jpeg

Padre Carlson

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002)~2.jpeg

S/L Milwood (Controller at Kenley 1943)

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002)~16.jpeg

Hugh Godefroy

Magwood Sqn Ldr C M  pilots 403 Sqn Kenley May 1943 (J E Johnson) via Andy Thomas (002)~19.jpeg

Charles Magwood

Request – Missing names – Part Two

Post 799

As an amateur historian I am always amazed by some of my readers’ knowledge or expertise. There is Stephen Nickerson of course who has helped me a lot with this group photo.

Last week I had received this request from Dean Black.

Hello Pierre, I have discovered a new photo – one many of us have not seen before. We need help with the names. Would you be interested?

Dean Black

I was of course interested in helping Dean with a little help from my readers.

Dean had written back…

Here is a photo that we don’t think many people have yet seen. We don’t know all the names. Here is what we do know:

The photo appears to have been taken in Kenley, Surrey in May 1943, and the names Magwood and J.E. Johnson are found in the filename.

I have identified the following:

(Back Row standing, left to right): F/O Johnson; unknown; Walter “Wally” Conrad; Norm Fowlow; Padré Don Carlson; Squadron Leader Charlie Magwood; unknown; unknown possibly Roy Wozniak; unknown; and, P/O Monty Berger (Int Offr).

(Front Row seated, left to right): unknown; unknown; unknown; Brannigan; Middlemiss; McWilliams; Dowding; and, unknown.

I hope some of your knowledgeable readers might be able to fill in the blanks.

Sincerely,

Dean

Dean C. Black, CD, CAE, SMP, B.Sc, MA, rmc, MALIC (York St John)

Lieutenant-Colonel (Ret)

Executive Director | RCAF Association

Editor-Publisher | Revue Airforce Magazine

Secretary | RCAF Association Trust Fund

I had never seen this photo before even if I had seen a lot of photos since 2011 when I created this blog honouring Greg’s grandfather.

I like to zoom in on group photos and I then try compare with what I have.

But I am not alone who likes to compare…

This is the first comment left by Joe…

Hello Pierre

OK, top row #2 Norm Chevers, #6 I dont think is Charlie Magwood. I’ll get back to you on that. #8 is Danny Browne, #10 is P/O Berger; bottom row #1 is Dean Dover #2 looks more like Magwood but …

If I think of any more, I’ll let you know.

If you are asking yourself who is Joe…

https://flyingforyourlife.com/

Request – Missing names

I have received a request from Dean Black.

Hello Pierre, I have discovered a new photo – one many of us have not seen before. We need help with the names. Would you be interested?

Dean Black

Of course I was interested in helping with a little help from my readers.

Dean wrote back…

Here is a photo that we don’t think many people have yet seen.
We don’t know all the names.
Here is what we do know:

The photo appears to have been taken in Kenley, Surrey in May 1943, and the names Magwood and J.E. Johnson are found in the filename.

I have identified the following:

(Back Row standing, left to right): F/O Johnson; unknown; Walter “Wally” Conrad; Norm Fowlow; Padré Don Carlson; Squadron Leader Charlie Magwood; unknown; unknown possibly Roy Wozniak; unknown; and, P/O Monty Berger (Int Offr).

(Front Row seated, left to right): unknown; unknown; unknown; Brannigan; Middlemiss; McWilliams; Dowding; and, unknown.

I hope some of your knowledgeable readers might be able to fill in the blanks.

Sincerely,

Dean

Dean C. Black, CD, CAE, SMP, B.Sc, MA, rmc, MALIC (York St John)

Lieutenant-Colonel (Ret)

Executive Director | RCAF Association

Editor-Publisher | Revue Airforce Magazine

Secretary | RCAF Association Trust Fund

Colin Forsyth’s contribution

Hi Pierre
I see you are still going strong; thanks for your efforts in this regard!
Not sure if your members are aware that the Imperial War Museum has recently digitized much of it’s gun camera collection. 403 RCAF can be found throughout this collection and perhaps folks related to 403’s pilots may find some interest here.
All the best to you and yours!

Jim

Meet Flying Officer Melvin Lloyd Garland

I had a case of mistaken identity last time. Flying Officer Garland was not the same pilot I had mentioned on a post written in 2011.

A Canadian Tempest pilot, Flt. Lt. J. W. Garland of Richmond, Ont., jumped two Focke Wulfs just 50 feet from the ground. He dived from 9,000 feet and destroyed both.

Flying Officer Melvin Lloyd Garland was posted with 403 Squadron and he deserves his place in the history of RCAF 403 Squadron.

This photo was shared by his son David. On this one his father is seen with his wife Marguerite. 

MLG3

David also shared part of his father’s log book which will help me document his father’s service during WWII.

David has also shared this taken Airforce.ca website.

Thursday, 17 August, 1944

Three armed recces today and a black day for us. On the first armed recce we lost F/O Weber, a newcomer to the Squadron whom we saw bale out and on the second we lost F/O Boyle, a second tour type, an old-timer of the Squadron and a darned good type.

We also lost F/O Garland  on the second recce, a newcomer, all to Jerry flak.

 

David copied what his father had written in his log book after he had escaped.

After several passes at many levels, I was climbing back up from one pass at about 700 feet when I was hit in the base of the right wing by a 4mm shell. The plane went out of control but I managed to recover and by trimming it hard managed to crawl along. I immediately turned for home and started climbing for height. The shell must have hit my oil cooler as the oil pressure was gone, the engine commencing to run rough and the temperature started to rise. I tried to jettison my crop top but had to slide it back finally. Flames started to come from the stacks and the temp had gone past the danger mark so I switched off the engine and prepared to bail out. By the time I reached approximately 2000 feet, undid my harness, opened my door, stood up in the seat, slowed the plane up to about 130 and looking down dove out. My trip was suddenly stopped as I was halfway out. Later I reasoned that it was my dinghy straps that had become entangled with the door. I managed to hack loose and after feeling myself slide along the fuselage and past the tail, I pulled the ripcord and waited what felt like hours. Suddenly my fall was stopped with a quick jolt and looking up saw my chute opened. On looking down, I was just in time to see my plane explode into the ground. I had bailed out I think near St. Pierre which was about five miles south east of Caen and at that time was in the center of fighting. I pulled my chute half shut in order to reach the ground as quickly as possible in case any German snipers were around. I landed in the matter of a few seconds in the center of a small field filled with hay. I released my chute and started to run as fast as I could to the nearest hedge. When about ten yards from it I heard something like “Halt” and on looking closely at a small hole in the hedge, I observed a German with a machine gun pointed at me. I immediately stopped and upon his direction went slowly towards him. On passing through the hedge, I discovered about thirty five Germans along the hedge. It must have been a German patrol which I had run across in No Man’s Land. After searching me, they commenced to move slowly back to their lines with their head Sargent keeping a very close watch upon me. We kept walking until about nine at night when the Sargent brought me to what seemed a divisional headquarters.

David also wrote:

F/O Garland would later escape capture and find his way back to London via the French underground. He would furlough back home but not have to return to battle due to the war ending. F/O Garland would return to Canada, marry his sweetheart Marguerite, and successfully obtain an Engineering degree from Queen’s and ultimately his MBA from Harvard.

F/O Garland with Marguerite had 6 children, 15 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren (still counting). F/O Garland passed away in September 2007.

1922-2007

Keith Lindsay, Edmonton meets Flying Officer Garland

Update

Flying Officer Garland is not the same pilot mentioned on this post.

A Canadian Tempest pilot, Flt. Lt. J. W. Garland of Richmond, Ont., jumped two Focke Wulfs just 50 feet from the ground. He dived from 9,000 feet and destroyed both.

Honest mistake…

He was posted however with 403 Squadron and his story will be partially told here.

MLG3


Ripples in the water.

The post below was written in 2011. There is a name of a pilot I did not research back then.

I have just received a message in my inbox and it is at the end of the original post.


Original post

This picture did not mean much to Greg when he was looking at his grandfather’s photo album…

 

Walter Neil Dove collection

Keith Lindsay was with this pilot when the Luftwaffe carried Operation Bodenplatte.

Click here for information on this pilot…

Canadian Fliers Down 36 German Aircraft in Luftwaffe Attack
London, Jan. 1, 1945 – (CP) – Canadian fighter pilots, in one of their greatest triumphs during the war, destroyed at least 36 of 84 Germans shot down today by the RAF 2nd Tactical Air Force.
The big Canadian score was rolled up as the German Air Force came out in its greatest show of strength for three years in an attempt to smash up Allied airfields in Belgium, Holland and France.

Five Planes Missing
Canadian fighter squadrons accounted for 35 enemy aircraft and the 36th was destroyed by a Canadian in an RAF Tempest Squadron Five. RCAF planes are missing.
Although the Huns’ low-level strafings included RCAF airfields and caused some damage, the operational program of the squadrons was not interrupted and approximately 300 sorties were flown. Some enemy planes were destroyed white the airfields were under attack and others when the enemy fled for home.
The pilot of one RCAF reconnaissance squadron, whose name was not immediately disclosed, destroyed two ME190s and damaged two FW190s as he returned to base.
Spitfire fighter-bombers also were active and destroyed or damaged several locomotives and freight cars in the German supply area around St. Vith in Belgium south of Malmedy.
The Canadian Wolf Squadron alone knocked down five out of a formation of 60 enemy craft which strafed the squadron’s airfield in the Brussels area. Two others probably were destroyed and another damaged in a low-level action that developed into the hottest dogfight for Canadian fighters in months.

Bags 2 Focke-Wolfs
Four RCAF Typhoons returning from a reconnaissance flight met enemy fighters and destroyed three and probably destroyed a fourth. Two were destroyed by FO. A. H. Fraser of Westmount, Que., and the other by FO. H. Laurence of Edson, Alta. All were FW190s.
A Canadian Tempest pilot, Flt. Lt. J. W. Garland of Richmond, Ont., jumped two Focke Wulfs just 50 feet from the ground. He dived from 9,000 feet and destroyed both.
In the Wolf Squadron dogfight, PO. Steve Butte of Michel, B.C., and Mac Reeves of Madoc, Ont., each downed two planes and Butte also claimed one damaged. FIt. Sgt. Keith Lindsay destroyed one and also had a “probable.”
These were the first scores for Butte and Lindsay.
Butte and Lindsay found themselves in a swirling mass of Huns as they took off on a morning patrol. Butte sent an ME-109 down in flames with cannon fire.
Next victim was an FW-190. “There were strikes on his wing and engine, and I saw him crash on the edge of a near by town,” Butte said.

Out of Ammunition
Then he hit an ME-109, seeing strikes and smoke, but losing sight of the enemy plane as it dived steeply toward the ground.
“By this time all my ammunition was gone and a Hun got on my tail,” Butte continued, “I managed to get on his tail, but couldn’t do anything about it.”
Lindsay shot one plane down in flames and registered a cannon hit on another, but couldn’t determine whether it crashed.
Reeves and his namesake, Flt. Lt. Dick Reeves of 1507 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Toronto, who is no relation, plunged into a flock of enemy planes while returning from patrol. Dick Reeves had to land immediately because of a faulty motor, but Mac, his guns belching, closed on the plane which caught fire and crashed. He attacked the second victim from underneath and the pilot baled out.
It was announced tonight that the Canadian Mosquito Squadron on the Continent during Sunday night destroyed two Junkers planes while on defensive patrol.

Keith Lindsay was with another pilot on January 1st 1945.

Mac Reeves was from Madoc, Ontario.

Walter Neil Dove collection

Mac did not come back from the war…

Walter Neil Dove collection

End of the original post

Message: 

Thursday, 17 August, 1944

Three armed recces today and a black day for us. On the first armed recce we lost F/O Weber, a newcomer to the Squadron whom we saw bale out and on the second we lost F/O Boyle, a second tour type, an old-timer of the Squadron and a darned good type.

We also lost F/O Garland (pictured below) on the second recce, a newcomer, all to Jerry flak. Here is the last entry of F/O Garland’s journal: On Aug 17 at 1800 hours we went on our third trip of the day strafing German trucks and transport in the Falaise Gap. I was flying #2 to F/O Greene and reached target in a few minutes.

After several passes at many levels, I was climbing back up from one pass at about 700 feet when I was hit in the base of the right wing by a 4mm shell. The plane went out of control but I managed to recover and by trimming it hard managed to crawl along. I immediately turned for home and started climbing for height. The shell must have hit my oil cooler as the oil pressure was gone, the engine commencing to run rough and the temperature started to rise. I tried to jettison my crop top but had to slide it back finally. Flames started to come from the stacks and the temp had gone past the danger mark so I switched off the engine and prepared to bail out. By the time I reached approximately 2000 feet, undid my harness, opened my door, stood up in the seat, slowed the plane up to about 130 and looking down dove out. My trip was suddenly stopped as I was halfway out. Later I reasoned that it was my dinghy straps that had become entangled with the door. I managed to hack loose and after feeling myself slide along the fuselage and past the tail, I pulled the ripcord and waited what felt like hours. Suddenly my fall was stopped with a quick jolt and looking up saw my chute opened. On looking down, I was just in time to see my plane explode into the ground. I had bailed out I think near St. Pierre which was about five miles south east of Caen and at that time was in the center of fighting. I pulled my chute half shut in order to reach the ground as quickly as possible in case any German snipers were around. I landed in the matter of a few seconds in the center of a small field filled with hay. I released my chute and started to run as fast as I could to the nearest hedge. When about ten yards from it I heard something like “Halt” and on looking closely at a small hole in the hedge, I observed a German with a machine gun pointed at me. I immediately stopped and upon his direction went slowly towards him. On passing through the hedge, I discovered about thirty five Germans along the hedge. It must have been a German patrol which I had run across in No Man’s Land. After searching me, they commenced to move slowly back to their lines with their head Sargent keeping a very close watch upon me. We kept walking until about nine at night when the Sargent brought me to what seemed a divisional headquarters.

F/O Garland would later escape capture and find his way back to London via the French underground. He would furlough back home but not have to return to battle due to the war ending. F/O Garland would return to Canada, marry his sweetheart Marguerite, and successfully obtain an Engineering degree from Queen’s and ultimately his MBA from Harvard.

F/O Garland with Marguerite had 6 children, 15 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren (still counting). F/O Garland passed away in September 2007.

Below are photos courtesy David Garland