Courtesy Ian Richardson

Hi Pierre, attached is a picture of NJ667 (the squadron Auster) in its original scheme which was completed a couple of months ago. 

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So what about just another Harvard…

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This Harvard was flown by an unknown pilot over Bagotville.

This is how I got it.

Bagotville

Collection Walter Neil Dove via Greg Bell

Greg Bell is Wally Dove’s grandson who shared everything he had of his grandfather’s war memorabilia.

Walter Neil Dove was stationed at No. 1 O.T.U. in Bagotville, Quebec,  on June 29, 1943.

1943 June 29-July 9

There is a lot of information on these log book pages.

1943 August 3-August 24

1943 August 25

He flew FE628 only once… July 15, 1943.

1943 July 10-July 21

1943 July 21-July 31

Wally Dove was not the pilot flying FE628, but I am sure he was the one who took that picture.

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Another Captured German Prize – Junkers Ju 86 R-1 – Redux

Comment just in…

The camouflage of the hangar looks like it was taken in Fassberg.
Rheinmetall and Blohm & Voss were at the End of 1944 in Fassberg for tests of the Bv 246 gliding bomb with the Fw 190A.

Original post below

Another guest post from Mark

Here is another photograph from my father George White’s collection. It was likely taken in Schleswig Germany.

It is a Junkers Ju 86 R-1 high altitude reconnaissance aircraft. The code lettering DD+GE 5161 Rheinmetall (AirMin 82).

The wing of a second Ju 86 can be seen on the right side of the picture. This aircraft may be T5+PM 5132, a Ju 86 R-1 that was flown from Fassberg to Schleswig on August 8, 1945.

This aircraft was rather unique. It was powered by Jumo 207 diesel engines, had a pressurized cockpit and was capable of flying up to 50,000 feet.

These 2 stroke diesel engines had 6 cylinders, 12 pistons and 2 crankshafts and no combustion chambers. Combustion is achieved between the domes of 12 horizontally opposed pistons.

This is indeed a very interesting configuration for an aircraft engine.

Mark White February 2012-5

 

Cheers

Mark White – February 2014

Greg… Are you still reading the blog?

I got this e-mail last week.

Dear Mr. Lagacé,

I am a Swiss author who has published a book about captured German WWII aircraft in 2011 (see my website vintageeagle.com). My book showed about 90 previously unpublished photos taken by Allied soldiers when they marched through Europe in 1944/45.

I recently acquired a photo of a Fw 190 fighter wreck that was taken at Fassberg. It had a distinctive colored propeller spinner. On your website, I found a photo of another aircraft captured at Fassberg that featured the same colored spinner, but was definitely a different aircraft than the one on my photo as it carried another tactical code on the engine hood.

I found your photo at the following page:

https://rcaf403squadron.wordpress.com/2012/02/14/reg-morris/

Reg Morris

And the direct link is:

https://rcaf403squadron.files.wordpress.com/2011/10/abandoned-fw-190.jpg

abandoned FW-190

I assume you received the scans from the family of Reg Morris and that you don’t have the originals. But I would be very glad if you could either make contact with the family or forward my e-mail to them. I’d be very grateful if I could use that photo for my 2nd book to show it next to the photo I recently acquired.

I am looking forward to hearing from you.

Kind regards,

Roger Gaemperle

 

Greg… Are you still reading the blog?

Please contact me.

More from Georges Nadon’s collection – Redux

This should get some people’s attention…

 

122 squadron 1942

 

Dear Sir,

My name is Mehdi Schneyders and I live in Belgium. I am a colored half Belgian – half South African, and a R.A.F. enthusiast as well. There are three Belgian pilots on this picture concerning No. 122 Squadron :

– First row ( standing ), first from the left : Léopold ” Coco ” Collignon.
– First row ( standing ), the short one next to the civilian : Léon Prévot.
– Second row ( seated on one wing ), fourth from the right : Raymond ” Van ” Van de Poel.

Posted to No. 350 ” Belgian ” Squadron, two of them ( Prévot and Collignon ) are becoming the C.O.’s of the unit. Van de Poel died on collision with another pilot.