Flying Officer Stanley Wilbur Matthews

Hi there, I’ve been very interested in the emails that you’ve been sending out lately and I’ve been doing some research into my cousin Stanley W. Matthews who was a Spitfire pilot with 403. He was listed and missing and presumed dead in November of 1943. When I was looking for information on the RCAF Association site, specifically the orders and reports for November of ‘43, it appears that it is the only month that is missing from that year. Do you have any idea why that might be or if there is another place I could look for the details of the squadrons activities and operations for the month that he was killed?

Thanks,

Rick Anthony

First entry in the ORBs of RCAF 403 Squadron for Flying Officer Stanley Wilbur Matthews

14-8-43

F/O S. W. Matthews reported for duty to-day to fly with the squadron.

Source

http://heritage.canadiana.ca/view/oocihm.lac_reel_c12268/951?r=0&s=3

To be continued…

McArthur and Doyle

Someone is looking for a pilot…
His name appears on this post on my other blog.

Thursday, June 28, 1945

A Board for the Disposal of Records and Documents and Correspondence for 403 has been formed to examine all such documents prior to disbandment. Posting advices have been received for the pilots, seven posted to No. 421 Squadron as follows: F/O E.C. Trumble, F/L A.V. Sainsbury, F/O A.A. Roy, F/L W.N. Dove, F/O R. Young, WO Hallett D.H. WO Ryder L.C. Seven pilots posted to 443 Squadron as follows: F/O J.R. Baker, F/O M. Silver, P/O G.K. Lindsay, WO Arsenault J.A. WO Barbour R.E. WO Pickering J.C. WO Watchorn K.S. The other pilots have either a very high repatriation priority or volunteered for the Far East and Occupation of Europe. S/L A.E. Fleming, F/L E.C. Doyle and F/L C.S. Yarnell are the only three shown with high priority for repatriation and are expected to return to Canada. Twenty other officers and two airmen pilots have been posted to the Squadron and will return to England for sorting out. No more practice flying.

 

Ryder

There is a Ryder on this picture. Kneeling behind the 9th airman starting from the left in the first row.
Not sure this was a pilot. Can’t see his wings on his jacket.

Pilote de Spitfire - Spitfire Pilot

Do you know anything about these two pilots who were stationed in France with 403 Squadron?

Avez-vous des informations sur ces deux pilotes basés en France avec l’escadrille 403?

McArthur & Doyle

Somewhere in France

Collection Georges Nadon

Doyle’s name is mention on this post.

F/O Bob Shannon of the Wolves destroyed an FW.190 at Hagenow just after it had landed and, as aircraft in large numbers were reported parked there and at Schwerin, the squadron visited those two aerodromes later in the day and damaged four enemy aircraft on the ground. S/L Zary claimed an Me.262 and a Ju.88 while F/Ls Reg Morris and E. O. Doyle each damaged an Me.262.

In the 403’s ORBS… (source)

Monday, April 23, 1945

A good flying day, with the gang airborne at 0530 hours right through to 2037 hours in the evening, which was a very tiring day for most.  The Squadron…

View original post 719 more words

Now this is how this blog works… Simple

Post 454

I post stories and pictures and you react to them.

Simple.

You don’t have to read all that I wrote on this blog.

You just have to be related somehow to someone who had been related to RCAF 403 Squadron during WWII. Use the search button on the right, top right.

Simple! Maybe I wrote something about someone you knew like Ron Forsyth

¨Mo¨Morrison,G.Nadon Ron Forsythe Holland 44

Or this pilot who flew “Belle”

KH-J - Unidentified pilot

Collection Georges Nadon via the Nadon family

Who’s looking for Jimmy? – Update 2

The original will follow this other comment made by Dean.

I have a copy of the newspaper article, but it has been many years since I looked at it. However, I seem to recall it was a single vehicle accident and alcohol was a factor. I also want to emphasize, Herman van Amsterdam said he is writing a book, and he wants to explore what he describes as…”an emergency landing…”. If you want to write a book, as an historian you cannot describe this as an emergency landing! Abbotts bailed out. He departed the aircraft. He took to his parachute. If you insist on calling this an emergency landing you had better state God was at the controls. This aircraft was trimmed in a certain way, that when presented with the flight balance resulting from Abbotts’  unconscious body, tangled with the parachute draped over the antennae, the aircraft itself entered a very flat spin, in a circular descent, losing about five feet  of altitude for every full circle the diameter of which probably measured five to eight aircraft wing-spans. The touchdown was upright, and Abbotts was uninjured. Witnesses on the ground watched the whole thing, and they could not believe the pilot was still attached to the aircraft and survived.

ORIGINAL

Dean Black has commented on this post about Jimmy…

I contacted the Abbott family about ten years ago. The amazing story about Jimmy Abbotts is that he survived the crash-landing of his Spitfire. Few readers might appreciate from the brief description above, but Abbotts tried to bail out of his Spitfire, but his parachute got tangled up in the aircraft antenna and cockpit riggings. Miraculously, even though Abbotts was unconscious the aircraft entered a balanced and very shallow spin – no one was at the controls and Abbotts unconscious body was hanging out one side. As the aircraft spun in an ever-decreasing diameter turn it narrowly missed the top of a barn, by inches, before “landing” ever so softly in the field beyond. Everyone on the ground witnessed this “crash”, and upon reaching the aircraft Abbotts only just began to wake up. When I spoke to the family in 2003-2004 I learned that Jimmy Abbotts died in a drunk-driving accident in the 1950s. The family sent me a chunk of Abbotts propellor – something he had held onto for many years.

I will share pictures of Abbott with Pierre.

 

Original post

This researcher is.

I am working on a book about WW2 and still searching for additional information on Spitfire-pilot Jimmy Abbotts (403 Sqn). At the end of July 1943 he became a prisoner of war after an emergency landing in the village of Hillegom in the western part of Holland. After the war he returned to his hometown Owen Sound. I love to get in contact also with his family. Anybody any suggestions?

Greetings,
Herman van Amsterdam

Any ideas?

Robert Charles Medforth 403

 Update

Newspaper article dated 1944

Niagara Falls NY Gazette 1944 Feb-Apr Grayscale – 0237

Who’s looking for Jimmy? – Update

Dean Black has commented on this post about Jimmy…

I contacted the Abbott family about ten years ago. The amazing story about Jimmy Abbotts is that he survived the crash-landing of his Spitfire. Few readers might appreciate from the brief description above, but Abbotts tried to bail out of his Spitfire, but his parachute got tangled up in the aircraft antenna and cockpit riggings. Miraculously, even though Abbotts was unconscious the aircraft entered a balanced and very shallow spin – no one was at the controls and Abbotts unconscious body was hanging out one side. As the aircraft spun in an ever-decreasing diameter turn it narrowly missed the top of a barn, by inches, before “landing” ever so softly in the field beyond. Everyone on the ground witnessed this “crash”, and upon reaching the aircraft Abbotts only just began to wake up. When I spoke to the family in 2003-2004 I learned that Jimmy Abbotts died in a drunk-driving accident in the 1950s. The family sent me a chunk of Abbotts propellor – something he had held onto for many years.

I will share pictures of Abbott with Pierre.

 

Original post

This researcher is.

I am working on a book about WW2 and still searching for additional information on Spitfire-pilot Jimmy Abbotts (403 Sqn). At the end of July 1943 he became a prisoner of war after an emergency landing in the village of Hillegom in the western part of Holland. After the war he returned to his hometown Owen Sound. I love to get in contact also with his family. Anybody any suggestions?

Greetings,
Herman van Amsterdam

Any ideas?

Robert Charles Medforth 403

 Update

Newspaper article dated 1944

Niagara Falls NY Gazette 1944 Feb-Apr Grayscale – 0237

Who’s looking for Jimmy?

This researcher is.

I am working on a book about WW2 and still searching for additional information on Spitfire-pilot Jimmy Abbotts (403 Sqn). At the end of July 1943 he became a prisoner of war after an emergency landing in the village of Hillegom in the western part of Holland. After the war he returned to his hometown Owen Sound. I love to get in contact also with his family. Anybody any suggestions?

Greetings,
Herman van Amsterdam

Any ideas?

Robert Charles Medforth 403

 Update

Newspaper article dated 1944

Niagara Falls NY Gazette 1944 Feb-Apr Grayscale – 0237