403 Squadron Pilots at Diepholz, Germany April 1945

Dean Black sent me more information he had about 403 Squadron.

This picture was taken at Diepholz, Germany, in April 1945.

 

Photo #30

Photo from Neil Dove & Bob Barbour

Front Row L to R:   Reg Morris, Keith Lindsay, Squadron Adjutant, Squadron Leader Hank Zary, Al Fleming, Bob Barbour

Back Row:  John Pickering, Cy Yarnell, Mo Morrison, Mac McLeod.

Dean added a note…

Zary, Barbour and Morrison were flying TB 752 at this time 

Source: http://spitfiremuseum.org.uk/spitfire/pilots.htm

The squadron moved to Eindhoven.

The war was far from over as we can see in these logbook pages.

TB752

There is little doubt that so far as Aurel was concerned flying the Spitfire was a dream come true.

As he puts it, “the sheer enjoyment of flying such a plane was incredible”.

Many 403 pilots flew this particular Spitfire.

From the book “The Manston Spitfire” by Lewis Deal
Published 1981  ISBN 0 948305 01 0

To learn more click here.

Most of the names appear in Walter Neil Dove’s photo album and on this logbook page.

No 403 Squadron (RCAF) Wolf Squadron Squadron Code KH-Z

Flight Sergeant Robert E Barbour

Flying Officer David Leslie

Flight Lieutenant James D Lindsay (DFC)

Flight Lieutenant R A Morrison

Flight Lieutenant C Leslie Rispler

Flying Officer Aurel A Roy

Flying Officer Robert C Shannon

Flying Officer Arthur Van R Sainsbury

Flying Officer Frederick W Town

Flying Officer Robert Young

Squadron Leader Henry P M Zary (DFC)

You will find these pictures on the site.

SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK XVI (LF) – TYPE 361 SERIAL TB752

Pilots

This is the list of the pilots of 403 Squadron found in the logbook.

One thing that might not get noticed with the names highlighted is that Hank Zary survived the war contrary to Hank Byrd, Mac Reeves and Grant Aitcheson.

Hank Zary was a squadron leader and Walter Neil Dove called him the Chief…

The Chief died in 1946.

Hank Zary died of pleurisy on 11 February 1946 at the Royal Edward Laurentian Hospital (Sainte-Agathe-des-Monts division) where they specialized in treating tuberculosis & other chest problems.

Click here. 

Walter Neil Dove thus added this information after the war. Like so many war veterans Greg’s grandfather kept in touch with his comrades.

I wonder how the other pilots used to call affectionately Walter Neil Dove. 

Flight Sergeant Robert E Barbour

This time Flight Sergeant Robert E Barbour is in the group picture.

I found this… in this text…

Little is known of Barbour’s wartime flying service although he joined 403 RCAF Squadron (127 Wing) in March 1945 and almost immediately began armed reconnaissance, patrols, dive bombing, escort duties etc. As well as flying Mk XVI Spitfires, Bob also flew Austers and a captured Blucher aircraft.

ROBERT E ‘BOB’ BARBOUR

Along with ‘Mo’ Morrison, Bob Barbour defied all efforts to trace him for some 6 years mainly because research centred around his home town of Brantford, Ontario, Canada, but a final attempt in ‘Air Force’ magazine by 403 CAF Squadron in 1984 resulted in a group photograph including Barbour being spotted by a friend who contacted Bob who was actually living in British Columbia.

Bob Barbour was born in Toronto in 1924. He attended elementary and high school in Brantford and began college at Ontario Agricultural College in Guelph, Ontario. In the autumn of 1942 Bob joined the University Air Training Corps which is why his service number began with ‘U’ instead of the usual ‘R’: he became a regular airman in February 1943 and learnt to fly on Tiger Moths at St Catharines, Ontario. Bob obtained his wings at Dunnville Ontario where he flew Harvards.

Shortly afterwards Bob was sent to the UK where he flew Miles Masters at Peterborough with “one memorable hour in a Hurricane”. At Rednae in Shropshire he transferred to Spitfire Vs for his operation training: he progressed to flying Spitfire IXs at Dunsfold, Surrey.

Little is known of Barbour’s wartime flying service although he joined 403 RCAF Squadron (127 Wing) in March 1945 and almost immediately began armed reconnaissance, patrols, dive bombing, escort duties etc. As well as flying Mk XVI Spitfires, Bob also flew Austers and a captured Blucher aircraft.

After discharge from the RCAF in 1946, Bob returned to Ontario Agricultural College (now the University of Guelph). During his working career he worked for two chemical companies and in 1967 became a high school science teacher.