Mark’s First Contribution – Redux

Editor’s  note  

I know this is not next Tuesday, but this is Mark’s  second contribution, not his first. You see how  hard it  is  to follow  this blog.

***

Original  post

Mark wrote another comment.

People usually don’t read reader’s comments on blogs.

I do.

This comment is most interesting because Mark mentions January 1, 1945. Click here to learn more.

Thanks for setting up an Erks category.

I can’t wait to start releasing the stuff I have – I’m really glad I have found this site where I can finally share it. This is the place and the community that will appreciate it.

I can recognize some of my dad’s “crew” in this group shot from my pictures.

My dad’s crew was referred to as the “Number 1″. I understand they held the time record for swapping out a Merlin engine that could not be beaten. His “crew” managed to stay together during the war on the continent, except for one member, who was killed during an attack on their airdrome January 01, 1945. I’ll get into more of the details I know about that later.

I’m pretty sure the guy in the back row to the right of the prop blade with the arrow drawn across the left shoulder is my father, George Edward White LAC R119501.

I have a picture of him standing in the bottom of a large bomb crater in exactly the same pose – right hand on the hip – take in Normandy 1944.

What I really notice in this picture at the end of the war, is the way many of these young men rapidly age during the course of the war. My dad was born in 1921 and he would have just turned 24 in August of 1945.

Mark

Mark  also mentions a whole lot more information about this picture.

I’m pretty sure the guy in the back row to the right of the prop blade with the arrow drawn across the left shoulder is my father, George Edward White LAC R119501.

More about erks…

Someone whose father was also a groung crew wrote a comment once on my other blog Lest We Forget.

His father was with RCAF 425 Alouette. His name was Roly Leblanc. I wrote several articles during Rememberance Week 2011.

Great pictures!

Click here.

Erks’, is a kindly word meaning your ground crew guys! I’ve not heard that term used since those days!

George Stewart DFC, 23 Squadron Mosquito pilot

paul-beaudet-and-george-stewart-1

UPDATE

Good morning Mark, thank you very much for writing about your Dad’s memories, it certainly takes me back a few years about 70 to be close enough. Without erks or men like your Dad who were so dedicated to their work the Spits could not fly, not very far anyway. Although I am sure that I must have seen your Dad many times as I frequently roamed around or maybe in the same lineup at the mess or even sitting next to him at the movie tent. A thousand reasons, no a million reasons why you should be proud of your Dad.

Who cares?,you do , I do, and All the thousands who stood for hours last November 11, at the War Memorial to applause and cheer continually while veterans, most in their late 80s or 90s, and I was one of them. The same ceremonies attracted crowds all through Canada.

Why?

Because THEY CARED.

Again Mark, those crowds were saying to your Dad and all vets Thank You.

John B.

9 thoughts on “Mark’s First Contribution – Redux

  1. Good morning Mark,

    thank you very much for writing about your Dad’s memories, it certainly takes me back a few years about 70 to be close enough. Without erks or men like your Dad who were so dedicated to their work the Spits could not fly, not very far anyway. Although I am sure that I must have seen your Dad many times as I frequently roamed around or maybe in the same lineup at the mess or even sitting next to him at the movie tent. A thousand reasons, no a million reasons why you should be proud of your Dad.

    Who cares?,you do , I do, and All the thousands who stood for hours last November 11, at the War Memorial to applause and cheer continually while veterans, most in their late 80s or 90s, and I was one of them. The same ceremonies attracted crowds all through Canada.

    Why?

    Because THEY CARED.

    Again Mark, those crowds were saying to your Dad and all vets Thank You.

    John B.

    • John,
      I’m very pleased you are enjoying theses stories. I have plenty more to share.
      You mentioned in your E Book about Churchill’s visit to the airfield, so I started writing up the story from the material I have.
      I didn’t get too far – I discovered another great story about a 43 year old Spitfire pilot that you may have some recollection of.
      I’ve got the story finished and I should be able to get it to Pierre tonight.
      John, thanks again for the very kind words.
      Cheers
      Mark

  2. Two thoughts …….

    1. The comments on blogs, like footnote, frequently contain supplemental information of immense interest. Those that look at them and think “ho hum” miss a great deal.

    2. It is amazing how rapidly the young men aged during the War. Wouldn’t it be interesting if someone hosted a “before and after” blog with a gallery of photographs?

    • War changed these men a lot and caused many to rapidly age. In some of the pictures I have, I actually have a hard time recognizing my own father because his appearance changes.

      These men worked hard and lived under stressful circumstances. They lived in bad conditions and they also did not have a great diet. In spite of all this, I don’t have any indication that these men ever really complained about anything – they had a job to do and they just did it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s