Erks and the necktie story

I first  heard the word “erks” from George  Stewart’s mouth when  he phoned me in 2011. I  never thought  a Mosquito  pilot  would  have ever phoned  me.

I asked John last  Saturday  if he knew George Stewart.

He did not.

I  am sure  George  doesn’t  know  who is J. B. Le May also because I am  pretty  sure George doesn’t  read this blog, not even  my blog about  23 Squadron,  a night intruder  squadron  in the R.A.F., the squadron  he flew with in WWII.

It doesn’t  really matter because  I  just write  so people will  find  my blogs  about  their  father, grandfather, uncle, granduncle… just like Andrew Tood did a few years ago.

All this writing  about  people  I  knew  nothing  about  led me to meet virtually,  or in person,  wonderful  caring human  beings.

I  could  write  a book about  all these meetings, but I  am too busy writing  my blogs.

This  being  said, John B. told  me so many anecdotes  when  I  met  him that I  have enough  material  to fill a book. Luckily  he wrote  most everything  in his ebook.

Take  the  time  to  read it.

ebook

Now what about the necktie  story  I  told John  B.?

https://rcaf403squadron.wordpress.com/2013/11/19/the-necktie/

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Mark White’s first post – 403 Erks Captured German Truck

Editor’s  note

Every  Tuesday  morning  I  will  post  once again  Mark White’s  articles. I  will  add after more  information that  came  to  light  since  they  were  published.

***

 

This post is from Mark White’s pen. His dad was an erk with 403 Squadron.

Mark wrote this e-mail…

Pierre,

Here’s my first serious post – many more will likely be coming your way.

Cheers

Mark

403 Erks Captured German Truck

Towards the end of the war, 403 Squadron operated out of 127 Airfield near Soldau Germany. 

This was known as Base 154 or B154. They remained there from April 26 until July 7, 1945.

B 154 was an abandoned German airbase known as Reinsehlen. It was about 45 km from Hamburg. It was quite near the Concentration Camp at Bergen Belsen and the swimming pool at Lüneburg Germany.

The Erks from 403 visited the concentration camp and the swimming pool. I’m posting some never before published pictures from my dad’s collection.
You can identify some of the Erks in these pictures in the 403 Group picture.

 

I showed a friend of mine, who is a serious military model maker, some of my dad’s photos. Steve had never seen a Maple Leaf painted inside a Roundel. He built a model depicting this truck complete with three 403 Erks. The Erk with the cigarette wearing the leather Jerkin is my dad. Steve won a gold medal at a recent model show in Calgary for his work depicting 403 squadron’s captured German truck at B154 in July of 1945.

The medium 4.5T cargo truck Mercedes-Benz L4500S was originally developed for civilian use. It was used in wide service with all German military units during World War II on both Western and Eastern fronts. A total of 9,500 trucks were manufactured from 1939-1944, most of them for the Wehrmacht. The L4500 had a 7.2 litre diesel engine with 112 HP and existed in 2 basic versions: 2-wheel drive “S” and 4-wheel drive “A”.

Steve’s Model Depicting 403 Erks with a Captured Mercedes 4.5 Ton Truck