Sorry John for posting so many things on the blog …

Erks were a most important part in any squadron.

This  next picture is part of  Wally  Dove’s collection.

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I found  this  picture  also in John Le May’s collection.

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Déjà vu…

It was about an erk named Dick O’Sullivan.

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Editor’s notes

Production of this CD is the result of a collaboration
The hard work….scanning…cataloguing…photography…caption editing etc.., -: John B. Le May – rcaf127@gmail.com

The fun stuff….HTML and multimedia programming: – Marcel Lemay – lemaymanufactur@gmail.com

Some material on this CD may be copyrighted and is not to be distributed commercially

John Le May’s recollection – King of the Dogfights

Taken from John Le May’s CD…

JOHNNY JOHNSON….was my “boss” during the winter of 44/45 in Belgium which has been declared the coldest winter in 50 years…I believed them…man it was cold…How cold was it you ask? You don’t want to know. Back to Johnny Johnson who was a British fighter pilot during the Battle of Britain 40/41…ended the war with the most “kills”. My wife and I had a short breakfast with him in his room at the Château Laurier about 25 years ago on the occasion of the annual reunion of the Fighter Pilots’ Association. I had been invited as a member of the 2nd Tactical Air Force Spitfire Wing. and I had met most of them at some time during the campaign. He gave me his home address which is shown somewhere on this cd.

JEJ home address

Johnnie Johnson’s home address

Now I remember how cold it was…one day he asked me to take his 1939 Buick (which had been “given ” to him and get it checked at one of the garages in Brussels…On my way back to the airfield the car stalled and would not start. Finally reached his trailer office, did not wait for an explanation, picked up the phone and threw it at the car…missed me by “that much”. Otherwise he was a very sociable and friendly guy in spite of his rank. His Spitfire which bears the initials JE J (as shown on this cd) was at the Aviation museum just as you go in the from door. I have not been there for a few years although I live 5 minutes away. Maybe I’ll go back and check one of these days.

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JEJ (cont'd)

JE-J

Editor’s notes

Production of this CD is the result of a collaboration
The hard work….scanning…cataloguing…photography…caption editing etc.., -: John B. Le May –

rcaf127@gmail.com

The fun stuff….HTML and multimedia programming: – Marcel Lemay –

lemaymanufactur@gmail.com

Some material on this CD may be copyrighted and is not to be distributed commercially

John Le May’s collection – Never seen before pictures

Pictures taken from the CD John LeMay sent me.

Just showing off, this was a daily route march in the streets of Bournemouth…wanted to show the natives that we were all sober….no boos allowed.

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John’s postcards from the past.

Editor’s notes

Production of this CD is the result of a collaboration
The hard work….scanning…cataloguing…photography…caption editing etc.., -: John B. Le May – rcaf127@gmail.com

The fun stuff….HTML and multimedia programming: – Marcel Lemay – lemaymanufactur@gmail.com

Some material on this CD may be copyrighted and is not to be distributed commercially

John Le May’s collection – Never seen before artefacts

From John  Le  May’s collection

On a very rare occasion on our base there was an uneasy feeling about rumors that the war was almost over. German pilots were landing at our airfield on a regular basis and German troops were surrendering by the thousand all around our region. All of a sudden all Hell broke loose, this piece of paper was received by our Signals officer on duty announcing the end of the hostilities the next morning. The word got around like a wild fire in BC…… and we all had to duck for cover because some jerks went wild, firing their Sten guns, rifles, whatever they could find and that kept us lying flat on the ground for good hour. More exciting (and more dangerous) than the Casino fireworks. Fortunately there was no beer or liquor on the base so no one got drunk.
We were ready to go home at last…but not yet…on the same night there was another rumor…we were going to leave very shortly for the Aleutians (north west of BC) and support the allies against Japan who eventually surrendered following the devastation at Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August of 45.

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VICTORY IN EUROPE ….this was printed for the troops to commemorate the end of hostilities in Europe….

On the reverse side is a message from Sir Arthur Coningham, the same person who gave me his autograph before leaving for the continent in 1944.

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He later died in a plane accident…somewhere on the planet.

 vict.in eur. (reverse)

Editor’s notes

Production of this CD is the result of a collaboration
The hard work….scanning…cataloguing…photography…caption editing etc.., -: John B. Le May – rcaf127@gmail.com

The fun stuff….HTML and multimedia programming: – Marcel Lemay – lemaymanufactur@gmail.com

Some material on this CD may be copyrighted and is not to be distributed commercially