I Love This Blog

I am not the one who said this.

Peter Lecoq’s daughter wrote it in her comment two weeks ago.

I loved this blog. I am the daughter of Pierre Lecoq (Peter Logan). I have such wonderful memories of my trip to Kenley in 1966 where Dad was based. He loved to fly and I went flying with him many times as a child. I would enjoy any and all information about him.

Well, Marianne probably talked about the blog to her brother Peter because he sent me last week all that he could find on his hard disk.

Some pictures are exclusive because we have very few pictures about RCAF No.130 Squadron.

This is what I found on the Internet about that squadron.

To paraphrase Peter Lecoq…

Enjoy!

RCAF Station Bagotville

At the height of the Second World War, the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) selected a relatively level farming area at the head of navigable waters in the Saguenay Fjord to be the site of several aerodromes during 1941. This area was considered useful for RCAF purposes, given the amount of cleared land in the region, its relative geographic isolation and proximity to the deepwater port of Port-Alfred, as well as access to the adjacent railway network. Construction began that summer and continued through the winter and following spring on RCAF Station St-Honoré near Chicoutimi and RCAF Station Bagotville in La Baie.

The base at St-Honoré opened in June 1942, followed by Bagotville on 17 July 1942; St-Honoré being operated as a sub-base to Bagotville. RCAF Station Bagotville hosted the 1 Operational Training Unit (1 OTU) which trained pilots from commonwealth nations under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan (BCATP), as well as the 130 Panthère Squadron, which was an operational RCAF air defence unit intended to protect the massive Alcan aluminum smelter in nearby Arvida (one of the largest industrial facilities in Canada at the time), and associated hydro-electric facilities in the Saguenay region. During 1942 Quebec‘s coastal regions along the lower St. Lawrence River and Gulf of St. Lawrence were witnessing the Battle of the St. Lawrence as German U-boats were sinking Canadian shipping throughout the area. RCAF Station Bagotville was established, along with RCAF Station Mont-Joli to counter the U-boat menace to Canada’s war effort and placate local fears.

425 Squadron CF-18A Hornet currently based at Bagotville

Early training aircraft operating from RCAF Station Bagotville included Curtiss Kittyhawk, Westland Lysander, North American Harvard and Hawker Hurricane. The 130 Squadron, which was deployed at the base to provide regional air defence to key industrial facilities, used the motto “Défendez le Saguenay”, which was later adopted by the entire base. On 1 August 1942 the 12 Radar Detachment was deployed to provide air traffic control. On 24 October 1943 the 129 Squadron took over from 130 Squadron as the regional air defence unit; 2 months later in December the 129 Squadron was redeployed from Saguenay and the 1 OTU was retasked with regional air defence duties.

Toward the end of the war, RCAF Station Bagotville began to decline in activity as the requirement for BCATP training decreased. On 28 October 1944 the 1 OTU ceased operations, followed by the 12 Radar Detachment. In 29 pilot training courses given by 1 OTU at RCAF Station Bagotville (and St-Honoré), 940 pilots successfully graduated and 41 were killed during training.

In November 1944 1 OTU was disbanded and the closure of RCAF Station Bagotville and its secondary facilities at RCAF Station St-Honoré was announced; they were officially closed and mothballed on 5 January 1945.

Source

As a footnote to this… Walter Neil Dove was also stationed at Bagotville.

The proof is in his logbook.

Walter who?

You have not been reading this blog…?

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3 thoughts on “I Love This Blog

  1. In the group of photos of the men on the horses, the man second from the left is Andy Mackenzie.
    Dean Black writes.

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